What’s a Rich Text element?

The rich text element allows you to create and format headings, paragraphs,

blockquotes, images, and video all in one place instead of having to add and

format them individually. Just double-click and easily create content.

Static and dynamic content editing

A rich text element can be used with static or dynamic content. For static content, just drop it into any page and begin editing. For dynamic content, add a rich text field to any collection and then connect a rich text element to that field in the settings panel. Voila!

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How to customize formatting for each rich text

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

  • after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.
  • after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Headings, paragraphs, blockquotes, figures, images, and figure captions can all be styled after a class is added to the rich text element using the "When inside of" nested selector system.

Growing up you may have always wondered why your parents seemed to make a big deal about money, saving up for college, loans and interest, etc. “What are loans? What is interest?”  I will be honest and admit that it took me much too long to really figure out what it means to handle my own finances (eh- if not “handle,” then perhaps, “gain a basic understanding of”). If you haven’t heard it before, let me be one of the first people to tell you that while college can be four very fun years, the years that follow may not be a walk in the park if you don’t start understanding your finances now. Here are some basic finance terms and concepts you will want to start understanding now as you journey into adulthood.

Tracking

numbers written in a notebook to track savings
“Just WHERE is my money going??”

A good starting place would be to simply begin keeping track of where your money goes. If you cook, how much have you been spending on groceries? If you had to buy or rent school supplies this year, how much went towards softwares and textbooks? If you have a car on campus, how much did you spend on gas at the last pump? While it may seem like you don’t have too much leaving your pocket, the small things can and will add up. This applies to everyone but especially for those who still have the benefit of their parent’s income sustaining them. Knowing how much you spend now will help you better understand your own patterns of spending for the future when you finally have your own income.

Check out The Budget Mom’s article on easy ways to Visually Track your Spending.

Wants vs. Needs

supreme money launcher
“These shoes are NICE…. But so would be being able to eat this week…”

(I sincerely hope not everyone reading this had to or will ever have to go into starvation mode during their college years.) It’s important to differentiate between things you need and things you want. A methodical way of thinking about this would be that $50 spent on one thing means $50 less you can spend on something else. Do your $50 have to go to that pair of new sneakers just released, or is this your budget for the week’s groceries? Practicing wisdom in your purchase decisions will make a huge difference in the way you save. Although this is technically still a “want,” even investing in a brand new pair of dress shoes that you need for work or interviews may end up being more beneficial than getting that new pair of sneakers. 

There comes a fine line in balancing between wants and needs. This article from The Balance may give you better insight on how to properly differentiate between wants and needs.

Budgeting

hands counting twenty dollar bills
“What is your budget?”... “What IS A budget?”

Ah budgeting… you’ve heard the term before. But somehow it’s always maintained a top ranking position for those subscribed to a “scarcity mindset” - “Once I start budgeting, then I’ll start realizing how little I actually have.” However budgeting was never meant to help you realize how little you have but rather how much you have and how to [responsibly] allocate it. I hate to break it to you…. But budgeting will only get harder as you get older. May as well start now when you don’t have home loans and various insurance policies to worry about. 

You will want to start by keeping record of your various streams of income, whether it be through on-campus jobs, your parents, or other loans, scholarships and grants. Then, build out your expenses according to those various wants and needs we listed earlier. After totaling your income and expenses for the month, you’ll have a clearer picture of where you can make allowances versus restrictions. 

Obviously budgeting can get a lot more complicated than this. Once you get the basics down and understand how to read your own financial and credit card statements, you’ll have an even more comprehensive understanding of your budget. The Balance has a great step-by-step guide on How to Make a Personal Budget in 6 Easy Steps.

Credit Cards & Billing Statements

two hands exchanging a credit card
“This much money was due WHEN?”

Just because you now have a credit card does not mean you have unlimited money. If feasible for your parents, I would suggest asking them to have you signed onto their credit card as an “authorized user.” This will allow you to use their card independently while also building credit for yourself. Student credit cards are also viable options however there are still limitations and pros and cons that come with this option. Make sure you take the time to scrutinize different credit card options before officially signing up for one. Debit cards are also a good option for students. In fact, they help you deal with the reality that with cash, once it's spent, it's gone. This is a principle many overlook when it comes to dealing with credit cards rather than debit cards.

Either way, you will want to set a low credit limit so that you won’t have to fear missing payments and spending more than you have. The way to check that? Your billing statements and credit card statements. Both will be essential to learn to understand so that your payments get sent on-time and also so that you aren’t falsely charged either. 

Here are two great resources to help you out. Hofstra University’s How to Read a Your Billing Statement (to understand your college tuition and other payments to your school) and Discover’s How to Read a Credit Card Statement.

Student Debt

a meme of leonardo dicaprio about student debt

This one’s the kicker. We all know the memes about student loans. In fact, many of you are probably guilty of laughing at them without fully understanding what student debt is or means for you in the future. Basically, once you leave college you don’t want to be trapped in a deeper pool of money than you owe the bank because the amount of time it takes to pay off will grow, and that’s due to accrued interest. More money spent = more money owed = longer time it takes to pay. I think Miranda Marquit from Student Loan Hero puts it best:

“Your required loan payment will be the same each month. However, when you make a payment, interest is paid before any money goes toward reducing your principal. The remainder of your payment is applied to your principal balance.” - Student Loan Hero

Additionally, this list by Money Crashers has some great tips on how to Minimize Student Debt

Conclusion

No one wants to talk about finances, but unfortunately it’s a major part of life, during college, after college, and I would suggest even before college! While this is not a completely exhaustive list, these are the bare basics of what I suggest you take most seriously when it comes time to enter the “adult world.” Good luck, and smart saving!